01 Oct

Roasted Broccoli with Orange

This simple recipe with orange and garlic puts a zesty twist on your average broccoli dish.

Serves: 4

Ingredients
• 1 lb broccoli, tops cut into florets and stems peeled, quartered lengthwise, and cut into 2″ lengths
• 2 tbsp olive oil
• 2 cloves garlic, thinly sliced
• 2 tsp grated orange zest (optional)
• 1/2 tsp salt
• 2 tbsp orange juice (from 1/2 sml orange)

Directions
1. Heat oven to 425°F.
2. Line baking pan with foil. Put broccoli on pan and toss with oil, garlic, zest, and salt.
3. Spread in single layer and roast until edges brown and stems are tender, about 10 to 20 minutes depending on size. Don’t overcook. They should still be a little crunchy.
4. Toss with orange juice and season to taste with salt and pepper.

14 Aug

Tubetti Rigate with Long Cooked Broccoli Leaves and Pecorino

Serves 4

INGREDIENTS

¼ pound mixed broccoli leaves, washed & large stems removed
3-4 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
3 large garlic cloves, peeled, germ removed & thinly sliced
1 long fresh red chile, stem removed & minced
1 pound tubetti rigate or orcchiette
Salt, to taste
¼ cup grated pecorino cheese

PREPARATION

Bring 4 quarts of water to a boil in a saucepot. Add 2 tablespoons of salt and return to a boil. Add the broccoli leaves and bring back to a boil. Reduce the heat to a simmer. Cook for 1 minute. Drain and let cool. Squeeze the leaves gently, discarding the water. Chop the leaves finely. In the same saucepot, bring 4 quarts of water to a boil with 2 tablespoons of salt for the pasta.

Heat 2 tablespoons of the olive oil in a large sauté pan over medium heat. Add the chopped broccoli leaves and cook stirring often to prevent them from sticking to the bottom of the pan. Cook for about 5 minutes reducing the heat if necessary to prevent browning. Make a space in the middle of the pan by pushing the broccoli to the sides. Add 1 teaspoon of the olive oil to this space, then add the garlic and chiles. Cook for about 20 seconds or so, until the garlic is cooked but not colored. Mix everything together and continue to cook very slowly until the flavors marry. This should take about 6-7 minutes.
In the meantime, add the pasta to the boiling water & give it a stir so that the pasta pieces do not stick to the bottom. Stir several more times while cooking. Cook the pasta until it is just done about 7 minutes. Drain the pasta, saving a cup of the pasta water.
Add the pasta to the broccoli & toss together with 2 tablespoons of the pasta water to moisten. Add more pasta water if too dry. Continue to cook on low heat for about 30 seconds. Adjust the seasoning with salt if necessary then toss with the remaining olive oil. Plate the pasta and sprinkle with the pecorino.

02 Aug

Broccoli Salad with Bacon & Cheddar

This is one of my favorite salads in the summer using broccoli.  It was my mom’s recipe and I think she got it out of the Junior Women’s of Billings cookbooks.  Whenever I  make it I think of her!  Warm memories of us in the kitchen.

Broccoli Salad with Bacon & Cheddar

Yield: 6-8 servings

Ingredients:
1 lb. broccoli about 4 cups, cut into florets
6 slices cooked bacon, crumbled
1/4 cup chopped red onion, diced
1/2 dried white raisins or substitute dried cranberries
4 ounces sharp cheddar, shredded or cut into small cubes
½ cup chopped walnuts
1 cup real mayonnaise
2 tablespoons white vinegar ( I use cayenne wine vinegar that I make every fall)
1/4 cup sugar
Salt and pepper to taste

Directions:
In a large bowl mix together the broccoli, crumbled bacon, onion, raisins or cranberries, cheese and the walnuts.
In a small bowl stir together the mayonnaise, vinegar and the sugar. Add to the broccoli mixture and gently stir. Chill and serve.

14 Oct

Garden News – October 14, 2015

The gardens are really slowing down now, with the cooler nights and shorter days.  The leaves are falling and some of the trees are already bare while others are slow to let go of their fall clothes!  As I walk around the yard there is a crunch where there once was soft grass.  I guess it is time for one last mowing and then the raking that will go on for several more weeks.

That wind last Sunday did some damage here.  Three sections of my cedar fence went down.  The  4X4 cedar posts snapped off at the ground.  John Pugrud, my savior, will be coming to fix everything this week.  I don’t know what I would  do without him.  Thank you, John!  Some of the wire fence for the tomatoes also blew down.   The tomatoes are so heavy right now, but I am not going to worry, as I will be harvesting them all soon, depending on whether it freezes of not.

My friends Steven and Robin Earles are also bringing me lots of leaves and grass clippings that I will be spreading over my gardens getting them ready for bed.  Thank you Robin and Steve!  The garden and I love you!  I am also bringing in manure.  A light tilling will then be done and the garden will be ready for winter sleep.  Rest and rejuvenation are important….for me too!

This is the final pick up for the following subscribers.  Virginia Bryan, John Pugrud, Charis Cravens, Sonya Whiteley, Lindsey James, Paula Larsen, Vanessa McNeill, Merita Murdock, Kat Pakora, Alicia Pettys, Kerry Sandelin, Sue Tanner, Carol Wardell, Jordan Westerholm, Nancy Wilkin,  Mike Williams.

These remaining subscribers will pick up their last share on October 22nd.  Susan Baak, Jessie Browning, Annika Charter Williams, Steve Charter, David Duke, Pamela Gustafson, James Haney, Halcyon LaPoint, Paula & Tom Larsen, Vanessa McNeill, Nanette Kuhl.

I am not quite sure what the selection will be in your share this week, but for sure there will be  winter squash, eggplant, bell peppers, leaf lettuce, swiss chard, dry onions, broccoli side shoots, red cabbage, tomatoes and cucumbers.  With a possible frost and even a freeze looming just around the corner, I will be trying to time the harvest getting the more tender veggies out of the garden first. It is really dry out there and things are still growing, so I had to water with city water this week  as the water in the canal is too low to pump anymore.  The county empties the canal on the 15th of October.

With the crisp fall temperatures, its time to start thinking about those meals that feed the body and spirit….I like to call them “Soul Foods”.

Creamy Winter Greens Gratin

Serves four as a side dish.

You can make this gratin with your choice of spinach, Swiss chard, kale, or broccoli raab. You’ll need to boil the greens first, following the instructions below. You can also substitute any hard cheese for the Parmigiano.

2 Tbs. unsalted butter
1/2 cup fresh breadcrumbs
Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper
1 cup heavy cream
2 cloves garlic, smashed and peeled
2-1/2 oz. bacon (about 3 strips) or 1-1/2 oz. thinly sliced pancetta
2 cups cooked winter greens (spinach, Swiss chard, kale, or broccoli raab)
1/3 cup freshly grated Parmigiano Reggiano, or a combination of Parmigiano and another hard cheese like Gruyère, Emmental, or aged Gouda

Prep and cook the greens:

To get the 2 cups of cooked greens you need for the gratin, be sure to start out with the amount of raw greens specified below.

Cut off and discard the tough stems (use a small, sharp paring knife and trim around the stem). Bring a large pot of lightly salted water to a boil, submerge all the greens, and cook just until tender (see cooking times below). Drain well and then spread on a towel to absorb excess moisture. If the greens still seem very wet, squeeze them gently to remove excess liquid.

Spinach
Start with 1 lb. mature spinach, stems removed and leaves roughly chopped to yield about 7 cups tightly packed (or 12 oz.); cook for 30 seconds, just until wilted.

Broccoli raab
Start with a 1-lb. bunch broccoli raab, tough lower stems removed (almost half the bunch), as well as any discolored leaves, and the rest very roughly chopped to yield about 6 heaping cups; cook for 2 min.

Swiss chard
Start with 1-3/4 lb. chard, stems cut away and reserved for another use (slice, freeze, and add to your next vegetable soup) and leaves roughly chopped to yield about 9-1/2 cups (or 12 oz.); cook for 1 min.

Kale
Start with 1-1/4 pounds kale, tough stems trimmed away, leaves roughly chopped to yield 6 cups tightly packed; cook for 8 min.
Assemble and bake the gratin:

Heat the oven to 400°F. Have ready a shallow 4-cup ceramic gratin dish or casserole dish (any shape is fine as long as it’s shallow). Melt 1 Tbs. of the butter and toss it in a small bowl with the breadcrumbs and a pinch of kosher salt and a little ground pepper; set aside.

In a medium saucepan, bring the cream and garlic to a boil over medium-high heat (watch that it doesn’t boil over), immediately lower the heat, and simmer vigorously until the cream reduces to about 3/4 cup, 4 to 8 min. (Don’t over-reduce.) Take the pan off the heat and remove and discard the garlic cloves. Let the cream cool slightly, stirring occasionally to keep a skin from forming. Season with 1/4 tsp. of salt and a few grinds of fresh pepper.

Meanwhile, in a large nonstick skillet, cook the bacon or pancetta over medium heat until crisped and browned, about 7 minutes. Transfer to paper towels, and carefully pour off most of the excess fat in the skillet (but don’t wipe it clean). Return the skillet to medium heat. Add the remaining 1 Tbs. butter to the skillet and let it melt. Add the cooked greens, season with 1/4 tsp. salt if using bacon (omit the salt if using pancetta), and cook, stirring constantly, for 1 min. Transfer the greens to the gratin dish and spread them evenly.

Crumble the bacon or pancetta over the greens. Sprinkle on the cheese. Pour the seasoned cream over all, and top with the buttered breadcrumbs. Bake until the gratin is brown and bubbly, about 25 min. Let rest for 10 to 15 min. before serving.

For a change, serve these gratins individually. Just divide ingredients among four small gratin dishes and bake as directed above.

Emeril’s Favorite Cabbage

8 to 10 servings

Ingredients
  • 1/2 pound bacon, coarsely chopped
  • 4 cups thinly sliced onions
  • 1 1/4 teaspoons salt
  • 1/4 teaspoon cayenne pepper
  • 3/4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
  • 1/2 teaspoon sugar
  • 3 bay leaves
  • 1 head green or white cabbage (about 3 1/2 pounds), cored and thinly sliced
  • 1 (12-ounce) bottle beer
Directions

Cook the bacon in a large, heavy pot or Dutch oven over medium-high heat, until browned and slightly crispy, about 5 minutes. Add the onions, salt, cayenne, black pepper, sugar, and bay leaves. Cook, stirring, until the onions are soft, about 5 minutes. Add the cabbage and stir to mix well. Cook, stirring, until the cabbage just begins to wilt or soften, 3 to 4 minutes. Reduce the heat to medium-low, and add the beer. Stir to mix.
Cover and simmer, stirring occasionally, for 1 hour. Remove the bay leaves. Remove from the heat and serve warm.

Thai Squash Soup

Refreshing and earthy, this recipe puts a Thai twist on winter squash soup.

Serves: 4
Ingredients

  • 6 shallots, unpeeled
  • 1 can (13 1/2 ounces) light coconut milk
  • 2 cups reduced-sodium chicken broth
  • 1 1/2 pounds winter squash, peeled and cut into 1/2″ cubes
  • 1/2 cup packed fresh cilantro + 1 tablespoon chopped, for garnish
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 2 tablespoons fish sauce
  • 1/4 cup minced scallions, green parts only
  • ground black pepper

Directions
1. Preheat the broiler. Spray a sheet of heavy foil with organic cooking spray and place the shallots on top. When the broiler is ready, broil the shallots, turning occasionally, for about 5 to 7 minutes, or until softened and blackened. Remove from the broiler, let cool, then peel and halve them lengthwise.
2. In a large pot over medium-high heat, combine the shallots, coconut milk, broth, squash, and the 1/w cup of cilantro. Cook just until the mixture begins to boil. Reduce the heat, add the salt, and simmer for about 10 minutes, or until the squash is tender. Stir in the fish sauce and cook for 2 to 3 minutes longer.
3. Garnish each serving with a sprinkling of the minced scallion greens and the chopped cilantro and season with pepper to taste.
Recipe Tips
To make an edible soup bowl, cut a thin slice from the bottom of a small pumpkin or squash. Cut off the top and scoop out the insides, leaving at least 1/2″ of shell intact. The bowl may be cooked or served raw if it’s cooked, you can eat it when you’ve finished the soup!

***This is important!  Be sure and let me know if you are coming to pick up your share.  I know  it might be confusing with this last pick up because of the half shares.  It is confusing to me, too!  Just give me a call, or send an email to confirm that you are  coming, or if you have questions.

30 Sep

Garden News – September 30, 2015

The weather these last few days has been absolutely incredible, hasn’t it?  Such a difference from the 90 degrees we had last week.  I know this will be coming to a screaming halt within the next couple of weeks, as fall is here.  Did you get to watch the eclipse/blood moon on Sunday?  The clouds parted just in time for me to see the full eclipse.  It was beautiful and so very powerful.

Last week I was fortunate enough be invited to attend the 100 mile dinner at “Ten” in the Northern Hotel.  Tim, the executive chef, featured veggies grown here at Kate’s Garden, as well as beef from White Deer Ranch out of Fishtail, buffalo from Ted Turner’s ranch out of Livingston, coffee from Rock Creek Coffee Roasters, and a different beer was featured at each course (all 7 of them) from Uberbrew.  The food was over the top and as we all sat at long tables there was much lively conversation going on.  Such fun, and I was certainly honored and delighted to be included.  Tim is really wanting to work with local producers, so I hope the community supports him in his endeavors.

The nights have been quite chilly, which is prompting the tomatoes to ripen at an unbelievable pace.  I have so many that I am over-run!  There will be help yourself boxes full of gorgeous heirlooms, cherries and saladettes for you to take.  The summer squash are done, but the cucumbers are still producing.  Take advantage of the bounty, as when the season is over, you will have to purchase at the grocers again, and  the quality, flavor and prices will not be the same.

A word on the winter squash.  Winter squash need a light frost to gain sweetness in it’s flavor.  I do not harvest my squash until after we have that frost.  There are certain other crops that do well in a colder environment, too.  Broccoli, Cauliflower, Beets, Radish, Carrots, Lettuce, Spinach and the other greens can take a frost….just not a hard freeze.  I an in a conundrum …I really don’t want it to frost, as it will kill everything else in the garden, but I think we are all a little tired of tomatoes and cucumbers, right?  But the peppers and eggplants are just needing more heat and time to get bigger fruit and ripen and the winter squash need a frost!  What to do???  I guess I will just have to let Mother Nature take care of it for me.  Whatever happens, I am not in control.

There are only  two more share days after this week.  Because the majority of you are half shares, we would need to run an extra week for those half share subscribers, but we will have to see what the weather is like that final week.  I may have to have all of you, (both the full shares and the half shares) come on October 15th.  I will let you  all know how it will work out.

This weeks share will include the last of the radishes, cauliflower, broccoli, braising greens, beets, swiss chard, cucumbers, tomatoes.  I am including these tomato recipes so that you have some ideas for using them up.  The soup freezes well.

Heirloom Tomato and Mozzarella Tart


Yield: 2 tarts sliced into 8 pieces

Serving Size: 2 slices

A gorgeous side or appetizer for any meal. Heirloom tomatoes, marinated mozzarella and flaky puff pastry all drizzled with balsamic reduction.

Ingredients

1 package frozen puff pastry dough, defrosted and rolled out, then cut in 2.
Heirloom tomatoes
Marinated Mozzarella
1 Cup Balsamic Vinegar

Instructions

In a small sauce pan over medium high heat cook the balsamic vinegar until reduced by 1/2, about 3-5 minutes, remove from the heat and allow to thicken.

Heat the oven to 400 degrees, and line a baking sheet with parchment paper. Using a sharp knife, carefully slice (not going all the way through the dough!) a border about 1/4-1/2″ around the dough. Bake for 12-15 minutes or until golden.

Remove from the oven and lightly press down the middle to make it flat and even. Sprinkle with a little of the olive oil marinade from the mozzarella, mozzarella, chopped tomatoes, and drizzle with reduced balsamic vinegar.

Simple Roast Tomato Soup

This one has big tomato flavor with smoky notes and hints of fragrant herbs. It’s exactly what you want to be eating as the first leaves of fall flutter by.

4 large tomatoes, halved
1 yellow onion, quartered
5 cloves garlic, smashed and peeled
2 tablespoons olive oil
1 1/2 teaspoons salt
1/2 teaspoon fresh ground pepper (I am partial to white peppercorns)
1 1/2 cups vegetable broth, or you can also use chicken stock
1 tablespoon fresh tarragon, chopped
1/4 cup fresh parsley, chopped
1 tablespoon balsamic vinegar

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees.
Scoop the seeds out of the halved tomatoes with your finger. Tuck the garlic into the tomatoes, and lay them, and the onions, out on a rimmed baking sheet. Drizzle with olive oil, and turn everything to coat. Sprinkle with salt and pepper. Roast the tomatoes for 30 – 40 minutes, until the tomatoes are bubbly and the edges are brown.
Combine the broth, roasted tomatoes and onions in a large soup pot. Bring to a boil, turn down to medium-low, and simmer for 10 minutes. Add the herbs. Puree with an immersion blender or regular blender so that you maintain some of the texture. Add the balsamic, check salt and acid levels, and serve with an herb garnish and a piece of toast slathered with goat cheese.

Tomato Chips
Ingredients

Tomatoes (Can use others)
Kosher or Sea Salt
Dried Basil

Instructions

  1. Cut tomatoes into 1/4 inch slices. Arrange on dehydrator trays.
  2. Sprinkle very lightly with salt and basil.
  3. Dry on vegetable setting for 8-12 hours, or until crispy.

Cauliflower & Broccoli Salad

Ingredients

1 head of broccoli cut into small florets
1 head of cauliflower cut into small florets
1 small red onion finely diced
1 cup of dried raisins
1 cup of sunflower seeds
1 cup of real bacon bits

Dressing

1 cup of mayonnaise
2 tablespoons of white vinegar
2 tablespoons of sugar

In a large bowl, combine all the ingredients for the salad.
Mix together the ingredients for the dressing and poor over the salad.
Toss until blended.
Refrigerate for about 30 minutes or more before serving.

~~~This is a gentle reminder to please let me know if you are not going to be able to pick up your share.  Just call me and if I do not answer the phone, leave a message.  There is hardly a week that goes by that I do not have shares that have not been picked up.  I understand that sometimes things happen, but I can always leave your box out in front if you are going to be late, and if I know ahead of time,  I can leave it in the front on Friday morning.  Otherwise I have to find new homes for the shares.  Thank you for your consideration.

16 Sep

Garden News – September 16, 2015

We have had an exciting, busy week here in the gardens.  As I mentioned earlier, the garden is gaining interest from some of the local chefs, in particular the executive chef, Tim Freeman and sous chef, Tyler Ellis from “Ten” at The Northern Hotel.  Tyler comes here every week, walks through the veggie rows, tastes and thoroughly enjoys being here.  He takes product every week and I am so happy to be able to share the bounty with the restaurants customers.  They are featuring a special “100 mile farm to table” dinner there next Tuesday evening the 22nd.  All of the food will be local and I will be presenting during the event.

Things have slowed down a little with the cooler weather, but it is supposed to warm up again this weekend.  I have a plethora of small tomatoes that need to go, so if you are interested in them, I am selling them for $2 a pound.  I am going to roast allot of them myself and then freeze them to make soups and sauces this winter.  They don’t take up much room in the freezer and have such a great flavor, especially if you roast them with lots of olive oil and garlic. You can add some of your favorite herbs like rosemary, thyme, oregano and basil toward the end the the cooking cycle.

The beans are producing again!  So some of you  will be getting the snap beans and some the Romano, as there weren’t enough of one kind.  I have been creaming new potatoes with the Romano’s and they are so delicious, especially with a nice steak!  You can use the snap beans the same way.  Comfort food for a cool autumn night.

In your box will also be a nice head of cabbage, some beautiful new greens for braising (frilly red mustard, mizuna, red pac choi, lacinato kale and spinach), small white onions, broccoli side shoots, cucumbers, zucchini and heirloom tomatoes.

I don’t know about you, but I just love Asian Curries, any type, any  color.  My favorite, however is green curry.  This recipe is a mix between Indian and Thai Curry.  The broccoli side shoots would be perfect for this dish.  Feel free to add additional veggies and if you want more protein some chicken would be nice.

5 Ingredient Coconut Curry

Serves: 3-4

Ingredients

  • 1 can coconut milk
  • 2 tablespoons red, green or yellow curry paste
  • 2 small heads broccoli (and/or other veggies of choice)
  • 1 can chickpeas, rinsed and drained
  • ½ tablespoon cornstarch dissolved in 2 tablespoons cold water
  • optional: minced garlic or onion, cut up chicken breast

Instructions

  1. Saute broccoli (and onion/garlic if you’re using it) in a tablespoon of oil. After a few minutes, add the coconut milk and let simmer for 5-8 minutes. The broccoli should soften but still be tender-crisp.
  2. Add the curry paste to the pan and whisk it until it combines with the coconut milk. Add the chickpeas.
  3. Bring to a slight boil and add the cornstarch. Boil for about a minute, then reduce heat and let cool slightly. Sauce will thicken as the mixture cools.

It feels like fall is here and soups are a great way to transition into the season.  Since you have that nice big head of cabbage, why not make a batch of this soup.  It freezes well, too.

Sweet & Sour Beef-Cabbage Soup

This wholesome sweet-and-sour soup combines beef, caraway seeds, sweet paprika and cabbage—ingredients that star in a number of German dishes. It is particularly nice served with crusty rye bread. For an even heartier soup, add diced cooked potatoes along with the cabbage.

Serves 6

Ingredients

  • 1 tablespoon olive oil
  • 1 pound lean (90% or leaner) ground beef
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons caraway seeds
  • 1 teaspoon dried thyme
  • 2 1/2 cups  bell pepper and diced onion mix
  • 1 medium Golden Delicious or other sweet-tart cooking apple, unpeeled, diced
  • 6 cups reduced-sodium beef broth
  • 1 15-ounce can crushed or diced tomatoes
  • 1 1/2 tablespoons honey
  • 1 tablespoon paprika, preferably Hungarian sweet
  • 3 cups coarsely chopped Savoy, or green cabbage
  • 1-2 tablespoons cider vinegar
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt
  • Freshly ground pepper to taste

Preparation

  1. Heat oil in a Dutch oven over medium heat. Add beef, caraway seeds and thyme and cook, stirring and breaking up the beef with a spoon, until it is mostly browned, about 4 minutes. Stir in pepper-onion mix and apple; cook, stirring, for 2 to 3 minutes more.
  2. Stir in broth, tomatoes, honey and paprika and adjust the heat so the mixture boils gently. Cook for 8 to 10 minutes to blend the flavors. Stir in cabbage and cook just until barely tender, 3 to 4 minutes more. Season with vinegar to taste, salt and pepper.

I would like to make sure that you are all receiving the newsletter and hope you are finding it enjoyable and useful.  I have heard from several of you that you really like the recipes, but really haven’t heard anything from the majority of you.  So give me some kind of an idea if I am on the right track.  It does take a certain amount of time to organize my  thoughts in order to write the newsletter and it is important to me that it is serving a purpose.

Looking forward to seeing you all tomorrow.

 

12 Apr

Kate’s Ponderings & CSA Registration

It’s spring again!  Or, is it!  By  this time last year we had experienced lots of winter snow and heavy spring rains.  Not so this year….and the wind!  Oh my!  It blew down part of the north fence a couple of weeks ago and the willow trees self pruned like crazy.  I have had to resort to using city water to keep the trees happy and transplants watered.  The winter mulch of straw was removed from the  the strawberry and garlic beds as it was so warm there for awhile and with the winds they dryed out quickly.  We have been asking for rain, and we have finally been blessed with it.  The much needed moisture these last two days has greened up the lawn and brought sweet fragrance to the air from all all of the flowering trees.  The robins are so happy with the big fat worms that are now at the surface of the ground for easy picking.

I transplanted the scallions, bulb onions and green and red cabbages into the garden this past week.  Barbara came for her first day of work on Thursday and direct seeded radishes and beets.   The greenhouse is full of seed flats.  The tomatoes and peppers are looking fine!  I started more seeds yesterday.

The greenhouse is full of seedlings; peppers, tomatoes, parsley, basil and broccoli, and I started more seeds yesterday.  There is always so much to do this time of year!  My son, Greg, has been coming over to help when he can, and that has been such a blessing.  I may just turn him into a farmer yet!   I am always looking for more help in the gardens and a computer person would be great, too, to help with the on-line marketing/social media stuff.  Sitting in front of a computer is definitely not my thing!  If you or someone you know would be interested please give me a call, or send an email.  This would probably amount to just a few hours a week.

So you can see that things are on course for season 2015 here at Kate’s Garden.  Now, I only need more subscribers to my CSA and other outlets to sell the produce.  I thought that by lowering the subscription price and offering half shares this season that I would be encouraging more subscribers….but so far, that has not been the case.  I know that it is early yet, but the purpose of the CSA is for the producer to bring in early funds in order to pay for start up costs like seed, labor and supplies.  I am trusting that things will turn around as soon as the warmth of the sun and longer days return for good!

Did you know that once upon a time, Montana produced 80 to 90% of the food consumed in the state. The remaining percentage was shipped out of state and that was mostly grain. More, now than ever, it is important to have access to local, sustainably grown food.  Farming cannot be sustainable without the support of their local communities.   It is time to really think about how we, as individuals and as a community, can start to build sustainability and a vibrant healthy food system right here in Billings and the surrounding area. I encourage you to spend your dollar with local food producers and shop keepers so that they can continue creating jobs, paying their taxes and raising their families. That’s what community is all about. Farmers and local businesses are not asking for charity or demanding your support. That is, after all, not the idea. Most are just going about doing what we love while providing you a service that you may need. I can only speak for myself, but for me, it’s also not about getting rich, although that would certainly be great.   It’s about doing something that makes sense, while assisting us all in being able to eat well and stay healthy! We are really supporting each other!

There is a worldwide movement happening, based on this concept. All of the elements are in place and they are valid. Now, it is the cost, the extent and the organization of this movement that will decide if it succeeds or not.  Won’t you join me in strengthening this movement?

If you have been on the fence deciding on whether to join Kate’s Garden CSA, now is a good time to do so, as I will be starting an advertising campaign soon to bring in new subscribers.  I have a passion for growing healthy food, education and being in service to my community.  I would love to hear your comments and suggestions, so if you are so inclined, add a comment to this post or send an email.  I look  forward to hearing from you.

broccoli raab 2

The broccoli raab that I have growing in the greenhouse was the idea behind this quick and easy curry recipe, but the recipe calls for regular broccoli. Both will certainly work. I hope you are inspired to create this in your own kitchen.


5 Ingredient Coconut Curry

Serves: 3-4

Ingredients

  • 1 can coconut milk
  • 2 tablespoons red curry paste
  • 2 small heads broccoli (and/or other veggies of choice)
  • 1 can chickpeas, rinsed and drained
  • ½ tablespoon cornstarch dissolved in 2 tablespoons cold water
  • optional: minced garlic or onion

Instructions

  1. Saute broccoli (and onion/garlic if you’re using it) in a tablespoon of oil. After a few minutes, add the coconut milk and let simmer for 5-8 minutes. The broccoli should soften but still be tender-crisp.
  2. Add the curry paste to the pan and whisk it until it combines with the coconut milk. Add the chickpeas.
  3. Bring to a slight boil and add the cornstarch. Boil for about a minute, then reduce heat and let cool slightly. Sauce will thicken as the mixture cools.